Mum Life

Hi, Im Janelle. Owner and Mama behind MLJ. My blog is a space for me to share a personal side of my life. From Business to Mama tips, to amazing stories I feel to share. I hope you enjoy this little space as much as I do. 

xx Janelle 

A Mothers Hope: Part FOUR - Hope on the fifth floor.

Posted by Susie Bartlett on

Beauty is in the eyes of the beholder, and even as the Hemangiomas grew, to me Janelle was absolutely gorgeous.... But others weren't so kind.
.
Song of Solomans 4:7 - You are altogether beautiful, my darling, there is no flaw in you.
.
Over the next months Janelle's features did change drastically. Her eye started protruding, along with the surrounding skin. Her cheek also got fuller on the right side, therefore drooping that side of her mouth. The external birthmark on her nose became raised and bright red and her breathing got heavier. Our church congregation would see her when we weren't in the hospital and they were praying for her all the time, but it seemed like the harder they prayed the worse she got. I was isolated in the hospital as mobile phones weren't around and it was over an hours travel for friends to visit. I often had to make decisions on my own on what to do, so I just followed what the doctors said - after all they were the experts.
The length of time we stayed in the hospital was getting longer and I missed my other children.... they also wanted and needed their mummy. Their dad would drop Janelle's older brother Ben off at prep and her sister Katie at daycare. He would then go to work and pick them up later that day. Every few days they all made the trip to come and see us. I recall one day standing on the hospital flight of stairs, between the floors, and looking out the window. Down below was the city with hundreds of people going about their business, unaware of the families going through torment within the walls of this old building.  I felt like no one cared, like we were living in a different world.
We now had a entourage of doctors and specialists that would visit Janelle. Our two main ones were Dr Kemp, Janelle's paediatrician, and Dr Elder, her eye doctor. Funny how I can still remember their names, all these years later. We also had doctors come from other hospitals to see this rare baby with the birthmarks. One day, there must have been eight doctors circling Janelle's little cot, she loved the attention! I would sleep in that cot every night. The nurses would put Janelle in a medium size one so I could fit too, if I wanted to stretch my legs out, I had to bend at the hips.
The first approach of attack on Janelle's Hemangiomas was oral steroids, however this caused terrible ulcers in her throat and mouth. These were extremely painful and before feeding Janelle, I had to put numbing gel in the back of her throat with a big, long cotton bud. However the ulcers got worse and her crying was constant. I would walk, and walk, and walk Janelle at night in the corridor, trying to comfort her, I was so tired and felt hopeless not being able to soothe my baby. Watching the clock became a habit, as I was praying the time would past quickly so the nurses could give her the next lot of painkillers. Soon after that, they stopped the oral steroids. Janelle also wasn't coping with the lactose in my breast milk, so at 3 months old they recommend I bottle feed her.... to say I was devastated was an understatement, I loved breastfeeding. It was just another blow to an already terrible situation.
When we did get to go home people were starting to stare at my baby, even going to the supermarket was never pleasant. Some would make comments, jokes or just steer their children away. Unbeknown to me, word was getting around Ben's school that I bashed her. One time, an older lady approached us to look at Janelle in her pram, and asked what was wrong with her. After me going to all the trouble of explaining her medical condition, she went on to say that she thought my boyfriend had bashed her.... she didn't even credit me with being married. I faced a lot of that over the early years of Janelle's life, but God always gave me the tolerance to never snap back at people. I understood that they were shocked to see a baby so disfigured and spoke before they had time to think, I can't blame them for that. I found it fascinating though that Janelle's brother and sister never saw that she was different, they had always known her like that, so it was normal for them.
The worst blow about Janelle's appearance came from someone who should have known better, a relieving doctor. While visiting in the hospital on his rounds, and after discussing her condition with me, his comment was, 'you think she looks ugly now, wait until she is older!' He had an English accent, so thinking I had misheard him, I asked him to repeat himself, and word for word he said it again! In what must have been micro seconds, three things went through my mind. First, I wondered if I could punch his face from across the cot. Then I thought I might start screaming and put on such a scene, that everyone would come running. But finally I decided to tell him that the top doctors in the country had assured me that with cosmetic help, she would look fine. However, I later reported him to my doctor, who was very mad and promised he wouldn't get away with upsetting me. Looking back now by this stage I was getting depressed and little things like that were not helping.... in fact nothing was helping. Living on the fifth floor of the hospital was not the most uplifting place to be and each day was a struggle to not suffocate in the grief that floated in and out of each ward.  Yet God had me in His arms, it was the Lord who held me together.
Read part 5 here 
 

Read more

A Mothers Hope: Part FOUR - Hope on the fifth floor.

Posted by Susie Bartlett on

Beauty is in the eyes of the beholder, and even as the Hemangiomas grew, to me Janelle was absolutely gorgeous.... But others weren't so kind.
.
Song of Solomans 4:7 - You are altogether beautiful, my darling, there is no flaw in you.
.
Over the next months Janelle's features did change drastically. Her eye started protruding, along with the surrounding skin. Her cheek also got fuller on the right side, therefore drooping that side of her mouth. The external birthmark on her nose became raised and bright red and her breathing got heavier. Our church congregation would see her when we weren't in the hospital and they were praying for her all the time, but it seemed like the harder they prayed the worse she got. I was isolated in the hospital as mobile phones weren't around and it was over an hours travel for friends to visit. I often had to make decisions on my own on what to do, so I just followed what the doctors said - after all they were the experts.
The length of time we stayed in the hospital was getting longer and I missed my other children.... they also wanted and needed their mummy. Their dad would drop Janelle's older brother Ben off at prep and her sister Katie at daycare. He would then go to work and pick them up later that day. Every few days they all made the trip to come and see us. I recall one day standing on the hospital flight of stairs, between the floors, and looking out the window. Down below was the city with hundreds of people going about their business, unaware of the families going through torment within the walls of this old building.  I felt like no one cared, like we were living in a different world.
We now had a entourage of doctors and specialists that would visit Janelle. Our two main ones were Dr Kemp, Janelle's paediatrician, and Dr Elder, her eye doctor. Funny how I can still remember their names, all these years later. We also had doctors come from other hospitals to see this rare baby with the birthmarks. One day, there must have been eight doctors circling Janelle's little cot, she loved the attention! I would sleep in that cot every night. The nurses would put Janelle in a medium size one so I could fit too, if I wanted to stretch my legs out, I had to bend at the hips.
The first approach of attack on Janelle's Hemangiomas was oral steroids, however this caused terrible ulcers in her throat and mouth. These were extremely painful and before feeding Janelle, I had to put numbing gel in the back of her throat with a big, long cotton bud. However the ulcers got worse and her crying was constant. I would walk, and walk, and walk Janelle at night in the corridor, trying to comfort her, I was so tired and felt hopeless not being able to soothe my baby. Watching the clock became a habit, as I was praying the time would past quickly so the nurses could give her the next lot of painkillers. Soon after that, they stopped the oral steroids. Janelle also wasn't coping with the lactose in my breast milk, so at 3 months old they recommend I bottle feed her.... to say I was devastated was an understatement, I loved breastfeeding. It was just another blow to an already terrible situation.
When we did get to go home people were starting to stare at my baby, even going to the supermarket was never pleasant. Some would make comments, jokes or just steer their children away. Unbeknown to me, word was getting around Ben's school that I bashed her. One time, an older lady approached us to look at Janelle in her pram, and asked what was wrong with her. After me going to all the trouble of explaining her medical condition, she went on to say that she thought my boyfriend had bashed her.... she didn't even credit me with being married. I faced a lot of that over the early years of Janelle's life, but God always gave me the tolerance to never snap back at people. I understood that they were shocked to see a baby so disfigured and spoke before they had time to think, I can't blame them for that. I found it fascinating though that Janelle's brother and sister never saw that she was different, they had always known her like that, so it was normal for them.
The worst blow about Janelle's appearance came from someone who should have known better, a relieving doctor. While visiting in the hospital on his rounds, and after discussing her condition with me, his comment was, 'you think she looks ugly now, wait until she is older!' He had an English accent, so thinking I had misheard him, I asked him to repeat himself, and word for word he said it again! In what must have been micro seconds, three things went through my mind. First, I wondered if I could punch his face from across the cot. Then I thought I might start screaming and put on such a scene, that everyone would come running. But finally I decided to tell him that the top doctors in the country had assured me that with cosmetic help, she would look fine. However, I later reported him to my doctor, who was very mad and promised he wouldn't get away with upsetting me. Looking back now by this stage I was getting depressed and little things like that were not helping.... in fact nothing was helping. Living on the fifth floor of the hospital was not the most uplifting place to be and each day was a struggle to not suffocate in the grief that floated in and out of each ward.  Yet God had me in His arms, it was the Lord who held me together.
Read part 5 here 
 

Read more


A Mothers Hope: PART THREE - In need of hope.

Posted by Susie Bartlett on

PART THREE:

You know how sometimes you start on a journey of perils and trials, yet you are oblivious that it has even begun..... That was the denial I was facing, sitting in that hospital ward.

Isaiah 41:13 - For I am the Lord your God who takes hold of your right hand and says to you, do not fear, I will help you.

After a rough first night, what I was hoping would be our only night in the Children's Hospital, many tests were done the next day to confirm the doctors suspicions. I remained at my precious baby's side, determined to be with her for whatever they needed to do. I remember one procedure, that even now, 27 years later, brings tears to my eyes at the helplessness I felt at the time. Janelle had to have blood drawn for multiple testing and we were taken to a small room at the end of the ward, I distinctly remember it was the last room on the left hand side. It basically just had a steel surgical table and a few trolleys, cupboards and benches, stacked with needles, syringes, bandages etc. From memory it also had oxygen and CPR equipment. I placed Janelle on the table and the nurse strapped her arm down so she would keep still.... she started to cry. I tried talking to her hoping to soothe her but as the the needle broke through Janelle's delicate skin, her crying became worse. I could have coped with just that but the nurse couldn't find a vein, so she tried again only to be unsuccessful. Another nurse was then called and they tried twice more, by this stage Janelle's screams could be heard out in the corridor and I was starting to get distressed as well. Still no vein was found. I was beginning to panic but I was a bit shy and insecure back then and easily bossed around by others. The nurse refused my request to pick Janelle up and comfort her and after the fourth attempt she just abruptly said 'well we will just have to try the other arm!'... I ran from the room crying. It was the only time I ever left Janelle during a procedure and I later found out that nurses are only allowed three attempts at collecting blood and then they must call a doctor. Afterwards, I regretted running from that room and not standing up to those women, but in their defence they were just doing something they dealt with everyday and had become numb to. I, on the other hand, was in a world I knew nothing about, facing my baby having an illness I knew less about and still going through the raw emotions, a mother of a three week old baby feels.

 

So later that day, after the results came back, the doctors told me the devastating news that Janelle had four Hemangioma- 3 of them being internal. One in her throat, one in her cheek, one behind her eye and an external one on the side of her nose.  Shell shocked, I tried to understand this big medical word that they said would get a lot worse before it got better.... if it got better! Hemangioma is the medical term for birthmarks, which are a group of multiplying blood vessels that look like a tangle of fishing line. The have no easy border, so removing them is hard and Janelle would have haemorrhaged and died if they tried. Also the risk of her going blind was very real and depending on their growth in her throat, she was facing the possibility of a tracheotomy

 

I remember the doctor repeating that it was going to get worse, as if he was preparing me for what he knew would come. The disfigurement, the long term hospital stays and the possibility of it being life threatening... yet still, in my mind it didn't sink in. He explained that this was extremely rare, especially the position of the Hemangioma, and they were dealing in unknown territory. There were treatments they could try but no guarantee of success. Essentially...... Janelle was an experimental guinea pig.Multiple doctors appointments were booked before we were sent home, all of them at the hospital, so traveling was going to be a big part of our routine. I was bewildered, scared and yet still needing to function and look after our family of five. Most of all though, we needed a miracle!

READ PART THREE- Hope on the fifth floor HERE

 

https://www.mylittlejoy.com.au/blogs/news/a-mothers-hope-part-four-hope-on-the-fifth-floor

Read more

A Mothers Hope: PART THREE - In need of hope.

Posted by Susie Bartlett on

PART THREE:

You know how sometimes you start on a journey of perils and trials, yet you are oblivious that it has even begun..... That was the denial I was facing, sitting in that hospital ward.

Isaiah 41:13 - For I am the Lord your God who takes hold of your right hand and says to you, do not fear, I will help you.

After a rough first night, what I was hoping would be our only night in the Children's Hospital, many tests were done the next day to confirm the doctors suspicions. I remained at my precious baby's side, determined to be with her for whatever they needed to do. I remember one procedure, that even now, 27 years later, brings tears to my eyes at the helplessness I felt at the time. Janelle had to have blood drawn for multiple testing and we were taken to a small room at the end of the ward, I distinctly remember it was the last room on the left hand side. It basically just had a steel surgical table and a few trolleys, cupboards and benches, stacked with needles, syringes, bandages etc. From memory it also had oxygen and CPR equipment. I placed Janelle on the table and the nurse strapped her arm down so she would keep still.... she started to cry. I tried talking to her hoping to soothe her but as the the needle broke through Janelle's delicate skin, her crying became worse. I could have coped with just that but the nurse couldn't find a vein, so she tried again only to be unsuccessful. Another nurse was then called and they tried twice more, by this stage Janelle's screams could be heard out in the corridor and I was starting to get distressed as well. Still no vein was found. I was beginning to panic but I was a bit shy and insecure back then and easily bossed around by others. The nurse refused my request to pick Janelle up and comfort her and after the fourth attempt she just abruptly said 'well we will just have to try the other arm!'... I ran from the room crying. It was the only time I ever left Janelle during a procedure and I later found out that nurses are only allowed three attempts at collecting blood and then they must call a doctor. Afterwards, I regretted running from that room and not standing up to those women, but in their defence they were just doing something they dealt with everyday and had become numb to. I, on the other hand, was in a world I knew nothing about, facing my baby having an illness I knew less about and still going through the raw emotions, a mother of a three week old baby feels.

 

So later that day, after the results came back, the doctors told me the devastating news that Janelle had four Hemangioma- 3 of them being internal. One in her throat, one in her cheek, one behind her eye and an external one on the side of her nose.  Shell shocked, I tried to understand this big medical word that they said would get a lot worse before it got better.... if it got better! Hemangioma is the medical term for birthmarks, which are a group of multiplying blood vessels that look like a tangle of fishing line. The have no easy border, so removing them is hard and Janelle would have haemorrhaged and died if they tried. Also the risk of her going blind was very real and depending on their growth in her throat, she was facing the possibility of a tracheotomy

 

I remember the doctor repeating that it was going to get worse, as if he was preparing me for what he knew would come. The disfigurement, the long term hospital stays and the possibility of it being life threatening... yet still, in my mind it didn't sink in. He explained that this was extremely rare, especially the position of the Hemangioma, and they were dealing in unknown territory. There were treatments they could try but no guarantee of success. Essentially...... Janelle was an experimental guinea pig.Multiple doctors appointments were booked before we were sent home, all of them at the hospital, so traveling was going to be a big part of our routine. I was bewildered, scared and yet still needing to function and look after our family of five. Most of all though, we needed a miracle!

READ PART THREE- Hope on the fifth floor HERE

 

https://www.mylittlejoy.com.au/blogs/news/a-mothers-hope-part-four-hope-on-the-fifth-floor

Read more


A Mothers Hope: PART TWO - Has Hope left?

Posted by Susie Bartlett on

PART TWO:

Some days it really is a sacrifice to offer praise and thanks for our present situation. When we are stumbling, tired, and scared, God seems distant, and a grateful heart is the last thing on our mind.

1 Chronicles 16:34 - Give thanks to the Lord, for He is good, His love endures forever.

Upon leaving the hospital after the birth of my third baby, I found myself sitting on a bucket in a small kitchen, surrounded by ladies from our local church.... It was moving day. The loss of our idyllic property had been stressful but I tried to stay positive knowing that family was way more important than possessions and as long as we had each other and our health, things would be fine. I have to admit it was hard though, going home to a tiny two bedroom cottage with an open fire place for heating and just a 1/4 of an acre of yard for our children and animals to play.

However, we settled in and about three weeks after Janelle was born I noticed that she had what I thought was conjunctivitis and a tiny lump in her right cheek the size of a small pea. So off we went to our local doctor who told me not to be concerned, gave me some eye cream and said the lump was a small cyst that would disappear in time. The next Sunday during church I was still concerned and a friend said I should take her to the doctor immediately. I saw a different doctor this time and to my surprise he told me the take her to the Children's Hospital in the city! It was kind of surreal because I actually double checked with him the importance of it, mainly because it was 'once a month' Family Fellowship Sunday at church. This was where we all brought meals and dessert to share it after the service in a wonderful time of fellowship and food.... I really loved Fellowship Sunday!! I can't remember the name of the Doctor, however I remember his words, he said 'if she was my baby, I would be taking her now, I have never seen this before.'

Upon arriving at the hospital we were sent to the casualty department, where there were lots of people waiting - being that it was school holidays. Every kid and his friend had a broken arm, leg or a temperature. After a long wait we got to see the doctor, the lowly intern, then we saw another doctor, then another, then another, then another!!! Eventually we had a world renowned paediatrician ordering catscans, X-rays and a bed on the fifth floor. This was actually the burns unit but because beds were scarce, that was the doctors only choice. Sitting in that ward was one of the most confusing, surreal times of my life, my friend that had traveled in with me had gone home and I felt so alone. As I had walked down the corridor to get to our room, I saw severely burnt children floating on water beds in isolation wards, seen the faces of their distressed parents and the hard working nurses dressed in white gowns and masks changing bandages. Now I sat next to a little metal cot staring around the room holding my precious baby girl tightly in my arms. Opposite me was a five month old little boy who had three rows of stitches that stretched from one side of his head to the other. He also had a paralyzed voice box, so when he cried he sounded like a duck squawking. His cot was covered in plastic to keep things sterile to give him a chance to recover. The next bed had a young girl in it who had been thrown through the windscreen during a car accident with her mother. Next to her was a child having her third cleft palate operation, and next to our cot was a girl that I couldn't look at for very long, yet kept looking back a minute later. She was disabled, about 12 years old, and had her neck bandaged with tubes draining from it. Blood and pus oozed out from under those bandages and she was distressed and crying most of the time.

No one really spoke to me that night, or maybe they did but that feeling of being scared and alone now overshadows it.My thoughts at the time was, 'this is a mistake, my baby isn't sick, she's perfect, we don't belong here'. Yet the paediatrician words kept ringing in my ears, he had said, 'your babies condition is going to get a lot worse'.....and it did. My grateful heart was about to be tested.

READ PART THREE - https://www.mylittlejoy.com.au/blogs/news/a-mothers-hope-part-three

Read more

A Mothers Hope: PART TWO - Has Hope left?

Posted by Susie Bartlett on

PART TWO:

Some days it really is a sacrifice to offer praise and thanks for our present situation. When we are stumbling, tired, and scared, God seems distant, and a grateful heart is the last thing on our mind.

1 Chronicles 16:34 - Give thanks to the Lord, for He is good, His love endures forever.

Upon leaving the hospital after the birth of my third baby, I found myself sitting on a bucket in a small kitchen, surrounded by ladies from our local church.... It was moving day. The loss of our idyllic property had been stressful but I tried to stay positive knowing that family was way more important than possessions and as long as we had each other and our health, things would be fine. I have to admit it was hard though, going home to a tiny two bedroom cottage with an open fire place for heating and just a 1/4 of an acre of yard for our children and animals to play.

However, we settled in and about three weeks after Janelle was born I noticed that she had what I thought was conjunctivitis and a tiny lump in her right cheek the size of a small pea. So off we went to our local doctor who told me not to be concerned, gave me some eye cream and said the lump was a small cyst that would disappear in time. The next Sunday during church I was still concerned and a friend said I should take her to the doctor immediately. I saw a different doctor this time and to my surprise he told me the take her to the Children's Hospital in the city! It was kind of surreal because I actually double checked with him the importance of it, mainly because it was 'once a month' Family Fellowship Sunday at church. This was where we all brought meals and dessert to share it after the service in a wonderful time of fellowship and food.... I really loved Fellowship Sunday!! I can't remember the name of the Doctor, however I remember his words, he said 'if she was my baby, I would be taking her now, I have never seen this before.'

Upon arriving at the hospital we were sent to the casualty department, where there were lots of people waiting - being that it was school holidays. Every kid and his friend had a broken arm, leg or a temperature. After a long wait we got to see the doctor, the lowly intern, then we saw another doctor, then another, then another, then another!!! Eventually we had a world renowned paediatrician ordering catscans, X-rays and a bed on the fifth floor. This was actually the burns unit but because beds were scarce, that was the doctors only choice. Sitting in that ward was one of the most confusing, surreal times of my life, my friend that had traveled in with me had gone home and I felt so alone. As I had walked down the corridor to get to our room, I saw severely burnt children floating on water beds in isolation wards, seen the faces of their distressed parents and the hard working nurses dressed in white gowns and masks changing bandages. Now I sat next to a little metal cot staring around the room holding my precious baby girl tightly in my arms. Opposite me was a five month old little boy who had three rows of stitches that stretched from one side of his head to the other. He also had a paralyzed voice box, so when he cried he sounded like a duck squawking. His cot was covered in plastic to keep things sterile to give him a chance to recover. The next bed had a young girl in it who had been thrown through the windscreen during a car accident with her mother. Next to her was a child having her third cleft palate operation, and next to our cot was a girl that I couldn't look at for very long, yet kept looking back a minute later. She was disabled, about 12 years old, and had her neck bandaged with tubes draining from it. Blood and pus oozed out from under those bandages and she was distressed and crying most of the time.

No one really spoke to me that night, or maybe they did but that feeling of being scared and alone now overshadows it.My thoughts at the time was, 'this is a mistake, my baby isn't sick, she's perfect, we don't belong here'. Yet the paediatrician words kept ringing in my ears, he had said, 'your babies condition is going to get a lot worse'.....and it did. My grateful heart was about to be tested.

READ PART THREE - https://www.mylittlejoy.com.au/blogs/news/a-mothers-hope-part-three

Read more


A Mothers Hope: PART ONE - The Expectant hope

Posted by Susie Bartlett on

As a child, we grow up watching and knowing our parents are doing everything they can to make sure we have a good start and are well taken care of. To say my first year here was a little rocky is a huge understatement, and it hasn't been until becoming a mother myself that I finally have a small understanding of the fear and torment my parents went through that first 12 months. 

Ive heard my mother tell the story of what happened to me as a baby a million times over. So when I asked her if she would write a little Blog about my childhood, I expected a few paragraphs stating the facts, some brief stories and a little into how it must have felt going through the rollercoaster. When mum sent me the first few chapters, I read it with a lump in my throat and a whole new perspective of what living with a sick child must have felt like. 

 Whether you're reading for something to do, curious to know what happened or maybe you're looking for a little bit of hope in a world that can sometimes feel pretty dark. I really hope you enjoy it. 

- Janelle xx 

A Mothers Hope by Susie Bartlett.  

The Expectant hope:

Sometimes in life you go through a terrible, horrific crisis, like a bad nightmare that never seems to end, in fact the situation only gets worse ......this was one of those times and yet now it's just faded memories.
Romans 8:28 And we know that in all things God works for the good of those who love Him, who have been called according to His purpose.

The year was 1990 and life was busy with two children under the age of 5, yet my clucky thermometer had a high reading and I wanted another baby. We lived on a small farm in Healesville, Australia and had an assortment of family pets, so it was a idyllic place to raise children. Unfortunately falling pregnant had proven hard for me in the past and I had just had my fifth miscarriage, however the next month I fell pregnant with another little blessing. After a careful first three months, it was an uneventful pregnancy, however financial hard times had us quickly facing the loss of the farm to avoid bankruptcy. We had just joined the church and become Christians and I remember them bringing food parcels to help us save money for bills. By the time our baby was born, we were moving into a small rented cottage in town, a big step back in our life and with a lot of debt to be paid off.
I usually had no trouble choosing baby names but because I wanted the middle name to be Kylie, if the baby was a girl, and it was proving hard. Kylie had been a friend of mine, like a little sister, who had passed away at the young age of 15 years from an asthma attack, so it was important to me to have a special name to compliment it. So with only six weeks to go till my due date, I picked up a newspaper and on the back page saw a girl called Janelle. Later that night we agreed that would be our sweet baby girl's name...Janelle Kylie Bartlett. It would not be until three years later, that I would discover the significance of choosing that particular name.
 Janelle came into the world around about midday on the 15.12.1990. She should have been born earlier but she had her arm around her neck with her elbow sticking out. The answer is yes, it was very painful and that last stage where they say 'one more push' lasted over an hour. But nevertheless our little princess was born to add to our growing collection of gorgeous little munchkins and the intense labour had been worth it, as she was absolutely perfect.
 
On visiting the hospital's baby nursery during the following days I noticed a newborn baby boy, whose face was very disfigured. He looked like he had been punched in the eye and the right side of his face was bruised and swollen. My heart was saddened as I took in his tiny features and my curiosity grew wanting to know what was wrong with him. I asked the nurse what had happened and she explained that he had just come out the wrong way, bumped his little face and all that swelling and bruising would soon disappear. I felt sorry for the parents having their little boy look like that for his first photos, but was pleased to find out he would soon look normal again.... but then again, what defines 'normal?'. However looking back now, I believe this encounter was not coincidental, it was God preparing me for what I would soon have to face and He was letting me know things would eventually be alright. As I went back to the ward and held my adorable newborn baby girl, swaddled safely in a pink blanket sleeping peacefully, I was blissfully unaware that I had just hopped on a huge rollercoaster ride!
Go to PART TWO: Has hope left  
 

Read more

A Mothers Hope: PART ONE - The Expectant hope

Posted by Susie Bartlett on

As a child, we grow up watching and knowing our parents are doing everything they can to make sure we have a good start and are well taken care of. To say my first year here was a little rocky is a huge understatement, and it hasn't been until becoming a mother myself that I finally have a small understanding of the fear and torment my parents went through that first 12 months. 

Ive heard my mother tell the story of what happened to me as a baby a million times over. So when I asked her if she would write a little Blog about my childhood, I expected a few paragraphs stating the facts, some brief stories and a little into how it must have felt going through the rollercoaster. When mum sent me the first few chapters, I read it with a lump in my throat and a whole new perspective of what living with a sick child must have felt like. 

 Whether you're reading for something to do, curious to know what happened or maybe you're looking for a little bit of hope in a world that can sometimes feel pretty dark. I really hope you enjoy it. 

- Janelle xx 

A Mothers Hope by Susie Bartlett.  

The Expectant hope:

Sometimes in life you go through a terrible, horrific crisis, like a bad nightmare that never seems to end, in fact the situation only gets worse ......this was one of those times and yet now it's just faded memories.
Romans 8:28 And we know that in all things God works for the good of those who love Him, who have been called according to His purpose.

The year was 1990 and life was busy with two children under the age of 5, yet my clucky thermometer had a high reading and I wanted another baby. We lived on a small farm in Healesville, Australia and had an assortment of family pets, so it was a idyllic place to raise children. Unfortunately falling pregnant had proven hard for me in the past and I had just had my fifth miscarriage, however the next month I fell pregnant with another little blessing. After a careful first three months, it was an uneventful pregnancy, however financial hard times had us quickly facing the loss of the farm to avoid bankruptcy. We had just joined the church and become Christians and I remember them bringing food parcels to help us save money for bills. By the time our baby was born, we were moving into a small rented cottage in town, a big step back in our life and with a lot of debt to be paid off.
I usually had no trouble choosing baby names but because I wanted the middle name to be Kylie, if the baby was a girl, and it was proving hard. Kylie had been a friend of mine, like a little sister, who had passed away at the young age of 15 years from an asthma attack, so it was important to me to have a special name to compliment it. So with only six weeks to go till my due date, I picked up a newspaper and on the back page saw a girl called Janelle. Later that night we agreed that would be our sweet baby girl's name...Janelle Kylie Bartlett. It would not be until three years later, that I would discover the significance of choosing that particular name.
 Janelle came into the world around about midday on the 15.12.1990. She should have been born earlier but she had her arm around her neck with her elbow sticking out. The answer is yes, it was very painful and that last stage where they say 'one more push' lasted over an hour. But nevertheless our little princess was born to add to our growing collection of gorgeous little munchkins and the intense labour had been worth it, as she was absolutely perfect.
 
On visiting the hospital's baby nursery during the following days I noticed a newborn baby boy, whose face was very disfigured. He looked like he had been punched in the eye and the right side of his face was bruised and swollen. My heart was saddened as I took in his tiny features and my curiosity grew wanting to know what was wrong with him. I asked the nurse what had happened and she explained that he had just come out the wrong way, bumped his little face and all that swelling and bruising would soon disappear. I felt sorry for the parents having their little boy look like that for his first photos, but was pleased to find out he would soon look normal again.... but then again, what defines 'normal?'. However looking back now, I believe this encounter was not coincidental, it was God preparing me for what I would soon have to face and He was letting me know things would eventually be alright. As I went back to the ward and held my adorable newborn baby girl, swaddled safely in a pink blanket sleeping peacefully, I was blissfully unaware that I had just hopped on a huge rollercoaster ride!
Go to PART TWO: Has hope left  
 

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Shop the LOOK #1

Posted by Janelle Spies on

I remember a when we first started trying for bubba #1 about 5.5 years ago. I would 'google' baby nursery (because instagram was NOT what its like now) and be so in awe of those 'magazine' bedrooms, thinking 'I wonder who actually has a room like that, how amazing!'. Fast track a few years and Instagram is FILLED with the most insanely stunning homes! You only need to #babynursery or anything of the like and you'll see for yourself how talented some Mama's can be! 

We love supporting other businesses, so heres a look into some of my fav Insta homes featuring our cushions! If you like what you see, you can shop the look for the whole bedroom by clicking the links under the photos! 

BREE from @little_love_interiors  ( https://www.instagram.com/little_love_interiors/ ) 

Mama of two boys, Bree loves all things interior. Her style is simple muted tones with stunning natural timbers. Completely unique, her style is truly her own.

Pompom Mini Cushion + Floor cushion - https://www.mylittlejoy.com.au/

Teepee tent - http://www.littledrifterandco.com/

Round playmat - http://www.myhomestyle89.bigcartel.com/

White rug - https://www.olliella.com/

Timber Helicopter - https://happygoducky.com.au/collections/all

Snake Softie - https://www.fermliving.com/webshop/shop/kids-room/kids-objects/miniature-funkis-house.aspx

Timber Bead garland - https://minimamaco.com.au/

Soft toy Doll - http://www.luckyboysunday.dk/

 

 

Dandelion Floor Cushion -https://www.mylittlejoy.com.au/

Small Leather cushion - http://www.ninicreative.bigcartel.com/

White floor rug - https://www.lilypilybaby.boutique/

Personalised cushion - https://frankieandcodesigns.com.au/

 

Samia from @allthingsrosy_ ( https://www.instagram.com/allthingsrosy__/ ) 

New mama to her sweet baby boy Musa, Samia has a truly elegant style showing off a stunning soft palette of whites, grey, natural and the perfect amount of pink thrown in. From the nursery to the living room, everything about Samia's home breathes perfection. 

Pompom LUXE pink throw cushion - https://www.mylittlejoy.com.au/

Bed linen - https://www.adairs.com.au/

Pendant light - https://www.beaconlighting.com.au/

Comfort chair + throw blanket - http://www.kmart.com.au/

Grey pompom Floor cushion - https://www.mylittlejoy.com.au/

Cot - https://www.babybunting.com.au/

Canopy - https://talointeriors.com.au/

Cot Sheets - http://www.theyoungco.bigcartel.com/

Play gym - https://www.modernmonty.com/

Wall Prints - (Left) https://kidsofsummerland.com.au/ (right) https://norsu.com.au/

Tahnee from @homeofthewildings ( https://www.instagram.com/homeofthewildlings/ ) 

Tahnee is Mother to happy little toddler Parker. Known for her amazing woodland, natural look Instagram feed! Parkers room is nothing short of magical. 

Mustard pompom cushion - https://www.mylittlejoy.com.au/

Bed Sheets - https://www.instagram.com/ohdeerdoe.shop/

Wallpaper - https://www.cole-and-son.com/en/collection-fornasetti-ii/wallpaper

Canopy - Numero74 - https://www.growingfootprints.com.au/

Wall art - http://www.mrsmighetto.com/

 

 

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Shop the LOOK #1

Posted by Janelle Spies on

I remember a when we first started trying for bubba #1 about 5.5 years ago. I would 'google' baby nursery (because instagram was NOT what its like now) and be so in awe of those 'magazine' bedrooms, thinking 'I wonder who actually has a room like that, how amazing!'. Fast track a few years and Instagram is FILLED with the most insanely stunning homes! You only need to #babynursery or anything of the like and you'll see for yourself how talented some Mama's can be! 

We love supporting other businesses, so heres a look into some of my fav Insta homes featuring our cushions! If you like what you see, you can shop the look for the whole bedroom by clicking the links under the photos! 

BREE from @little_love_interiors  ( https://www.instagram.com/little_love_interiors/ ) 

Mama of two boys, Bree loves all things interior. Her style is simple muted tones with stunning natural timbers. Completely unique, her style is truly her own.

Pompom Mini Cushion + Floor cushion - https://www.mylittlejoy.com.au/

Teepee tent - http://www.littledrifterandco.com/

Round playmat - http://www.myhomestyle89.bigcartel.com/

White rug - https://www.olliella.com/

Timber Helicopter - https://happygoducky.com.au/collections/all

Snake Softie - https://www.fermliving.com/webshop/shop/kids-room/kids-objects/miniature-funkis-house.aspx

Timber Bead garland - https://minimamaco.com.au/

Soft toy Doll - http://www.luckyboysunday.dk/

 

 

Dandelion Floor Cushion -https://www.mylittlejoy.com.au/

Small Leather cushion - http://www.ninicreative.bigcartel.com/

White floor rug - https://www.lilypilybaby.boutique/

Personalised cushion - https://frankieandcodesigns.com.au/

 

Samia from @allthingsrosy_ ( https://www.instagram.com/allthingsrosy__/ ) 

New mama to her sweet baby boy Musa, Samia has a truly elegant style showing off a stunning soft palette of whites, grey, natural and the perfect amount of pink thrown in. From the nursery to the living room, everything about Samia's home breathes perfection. 

Pompom LUXE pink throw cushion - https://www.mylittlejoy.com.au/

Bed linen - https://www.adairs.com.au/

Pendant light - https://www.beaconlighting.com.au/

Comfort chair + throw blanket - http://www.kmart.com.au/

Grey pompom Floor cushion - https://www.mylittlejoy.com.au/

Cot - https://www.babybunting.com.au/

Canopy - https://talointeriors.com.au/

Cot Sheets - http://www.theyoungco.bigcartel.com/

Play gym - https://www.modernmonty.com/

Wall Prints - (Left) https://kidsofsummerland.com.au/ (right) https://norsu.com.au/

Tahnee from @homeofthewildings ( https://www.instagram.com/homeofthewildlings/ ) 

Tahnee is Mother to happy little toddler Parker. Known for her amazing woodland, natural look Instagram feed! Parkers room is nothing short of magical. 

Mustard pompom cushion - https://www.mylittlejoy.com.au/

Bed Sheets - https://www.instagram.com/ohdeerdoe.shop/

Wallpaper - https://www.cole-and-son.com/en/collection-fornasetti-ii/wallpaper

Canopy - Numero74 - https://www.growingfootprints.com.au/

Wall art - http://www.mrsmighetto.com/

 

 

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